A 4-year longitudinal evaluation of xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction in the Women's Interagency HIV Study participants

Mahvash Navazesh, Roseann Mulligan, Yolanda Barrón, Maryann Redford, Deborah Greenspan, Mario Alves, Joan Phelan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. Our purpose was to conduct a longitudinal investigation of xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction in a national cohort of HIV-positive and at-risk HIV-negative participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Study design. Data included responses to a dry mouth questionnaire, clinical evaluations of major salivary glands, and unstimulated and chewing-stimulated whole salivary flow rates. Repeated measures regression models were used to determine factors associated with xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction. Results. Significant univariate associations were found between HIV status and reports of "too little saliva" (P < .0001), ≤0.1 mL/min, unstimulated saliva (P = .01), and lack of saliva upon palpation of parotid (P = .02) and submandibular/sublingual salivary glands (P = .03). Adjusted odds of reports of "too little saliva" were significantly higher for HIV-positive participants (odds ratio [OR] = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.49 - 3.97; P = .0004) than for HIV-negative participants. Among HIV-positive women, adjusted odds of reports of "too little saliva" and of ≤0.7 mL/min chewing-stimulated saliva were significantly higher for those with CD4 < 200 (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.07-2.34; P = .022; and OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05-2.23; P = .027, respectively) and for those with CD4 200-500 (OR = 1.47; 95%CI, 1.07-2.02; P = 0.016; and OR = 1.37; 95% CI, 1.01-2.31; P = .001, respectively) than for those with CD4 > 500. Also, adjusted odds of ≤0.1 mL/min unstimulated saliva and ≤0.7 mL/min chewing-stimulated saliva were significantly higher in women on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (OR = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.05 - 1.50; P = .014) than in women not on HAART (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01 - 1.79; P = .044). Conclusions. HIV-positive women are at a significantly higher risk for xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction than HIV-negative women, and low CD4 cell counts and HAART use are significant risk factors for these conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-698
Number of pages6
JournalOral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

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