A comparison of spousal aggression prevalence rates in U.S. Army and civilian representative samples

Richard E. Heyman, Peter H. Neidig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study compared prevalence rates from reasonably representatives U.S. Army (N = 33,762) and civilian (N = 3,044) samples. Age and race were controlled by weighting each sample to 1990 U.S. Census characteristics for married, full-time employed persons. Men's reports of moderate husband-to- wife spousal aggression were not significantly higher, but reports of severe aggression were significantly higher in the standardized Army sample than in the comparable civilian sample (adjusted rates of 2.5% vs. 0.7%, respectively). Thus, controlling for age and race results in reasonably similar prevalence rates. Future studies that more carefully control for any background differences in military and civilian respondents could discern whether military service adds any increased risk for partner violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-242
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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