A Culturally Adapted Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention Among Muslim Women in New York City: Results from the MARHABA Trial

Laura C. Wyatt, Perla Chebli, Shilpa Patel, Gulnahar Alam, Areeg Naeem, Annette E. Maxwell, Victoria H. Raveis, Joseph Ravenell, Simona C. Kwon, Nadia S. Islam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examine the efficacy of MARHABA, a social marketing-informed, lay health worker (LHW) intervention with patient navigation (PN), to increase breast and cervical cancer screening among Muslim women in New York City. Muslim women were eligible if they were overdue for a mammogram and/or a Pap test. All participants attended a 1-h educational seminar with distribution of small media health education materials, after which randomization occurred. Women in the Education + Media + PN arm received planned follow-ups from a LHW. Women in the Education + Media arm received no further contact. A total of 428 women were randomized into the intervention (214 into each arm). Between baseline and 4-month follow-up, mammogram screening increased from 16.0 to 49.0% in the Education + Media + PN arm (p < 0.001), and from 14.7 to 44.6% in the Education + Media arm (p < 0.001). Pap test screening increased from 16.9 to 42.3% in the Education + Media + PN arm (p < 0.001) and from 17.3 to 37.1% in the Education + Media arm (p < 0.001). Cancer screening knowledge increased in both groups. Between group differences were not statistically significant for screening and knowledge outcomes. A longer follow-up period may have resulted in a greater proportion of up-to-date screenings, given that many women had not yet received their scheduled screenings. Findings suggest that the educational session and small media materials were perhaps sufficient to increase breast and cervical cancer screening among Muslim American women. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03081507.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • Breast cancer screening
  • Cervical cancer screening
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Muslim Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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