A Culturally Adapted Smoking Cessation Intervention for Korean Americans: A Mediating Effect of Perceived Family Norm Toward Quitting

Sun S. Kim, Seong Ho Kim, Hua Fang, Simona Kwon, Donna Shelley, Douglas Ziedonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Korean men and women have the highest current smoking rates across all Asian ethnic subgroups in the United States. This is a 2-arm randomized controlled study of a culturally adapted smoking cessation intervention. The experimental condition received eight weekly 40-min individualized counseling sessions that incorporated Korean-specific cultural elements, whereas the control condition received eight weekly 10-min individualized counseling sessions that were not culturally adapted. All participants also received nicotine patches for 8 weeks. One-hundred nine Korean immigrants (91 men and 18 women) participated in the study. The rate of biochemically verified 12-month prolonged abstinence was significantly higher for the experimental condition than the control condition (38.2 vs. 11.1 %, χ2 = 10.7, p < 0.01). Perceived family norm significantly mediated the effect of cessation intervention on abstinence. Smoking cessation intervention for Korean Americans should be culturally adapted and involve family members to produce a long-term treatment effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1120-1129
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2015

Keywords

  • Cultural adaptation
  • Korean Americans
  • Mediation analysis
  • Perceived social norm
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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