A randomized intervention trial to reduce the lending of used injection equipment among injection drug users infected with hepatitis C

Mary H. Latka, Holly Hagan, Farzana Kapadia, Elizabeth T. Golub, Sebastian Bonner, Jennifer V. Campbell, Micaela H. Coady, Richard S. Garfein, Minya Pu, Dave L. Thomas, Thelma K. Thiel, Steffanie A. Strathdee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We evaluated the efficacy of a peer-mentoring behavioral intervention designed to reduce risky distributive injection practices (e.g., syringe lending, unsafe drug preparation) among injection drug users with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods. A randomized trial with a time-equivalent attention-control group was conducted among 418 HCV-positive injection drug users aged 18 to 35 years in 3 US cities. Participants reported their injection-related behaviors at baseline and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Results. Compared with the control group, intervention-group participants were less likely to report distributive risk behaviors at 3 months (odds ratio [OR]=0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.27, 0.79) and 6 months (OR=0.51; 95% CI=0.31, 0.83), a 26% relative risk reduction, but were no more likely to cite their HCV-positive status as a reason for refraining from syringe lending. Effects were strongest among intervention-group participants who had known their HCVpositive status for at least 6 months. Peer mentoring and self-efficacy were significantly increased among intervention-group participants, and intervention effects were mediated through improved self-efficacy. Conclusions. This behavioral intervention reduced unsafe injection practices that may propagate HCV among injection drug users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-861
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume98
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Latka, M. H., Hagan, H., Kapadia, F., Golub, E. T., Bonner, S., Campbell, J. V., Coady, M. H., Garfein, R. S., Pu, M., Thomas, D. L., Thiel, T. K., & Strathdee, S. A. (2008). A randomized intervention trial to reduce the lending of used injection equipment among injection drug users infected with hepatitis C. American journal of public health, 98(5), 853-861. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2007.113415