A steady presence in the midst of change: Non-kin natural mentors in the lives of older youth exiting foster care

Michelle R. Munson, Susan E. Smalling, Renée Spencer, Lionel D. Scott, Elizabeth M. Tracy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the nature of the non-kin natural mentoring relationships among 19-year-old youths (N= 189) in the process of "aging out" of the foster care system. Data for the present study are from the final interview of a longitudinal study of older youth exiting the foster care system in Missouri. Participants that reported a natural mentoring relationship at age 19 were asked a series of qualitative questions about their reported relationship. The sample in this study was 65% female and 58% youth of color. Thematic analysis, informed by relational-cultural theory (Miller & Stiver, 1997), was utilized to explore the nature of the relationships from the youth's perspective. These youth reported having natural mentors who served in a range of roles in their lives, including youth service professionals and friends of their families. These older youth also described the (a) qualities of their natural mentors that were important to them, (b) specific features of their natural mentoring relationships that they perceived to be especially helpful, and (c) the various kinds of support these relationships had offered to them. Implications for social work policy, practice, and research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-535
Number of pages9
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

Keywords

  • Foster care
  • Natural mentoring
  • Older youth
  • Qualitative inquiry
  • Relational-cultural theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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