A water availability intervention in New York City public schools: Influence on youths' water and milk behaviors

Brian Elbel, Tod Mijanovich, Courtney Abrams, Jonathan Cantor, Lillian Dunn, Cathy Nonas, Kristin Cappola, Stephen Onufrak, Sohyun Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. We determined the influence of "water jets" on observed water and milk taking and self-reported fluid consumption in New York City public schools. Methods. From 2010 to 2011, before and 3 months after water jet installation in 9 schools, we observed water and milk taking in cafeterias (mean 1000 students per school) and surveyed students in grades 5, 8, and 11 (n = 2899) in the 9 schools that received water jets and 10 schools that did not. We performed an observation 1 year after implementation (2011-2012) with a subset of schools. We also interviewed cafeteria workers regarding the intervention. Results. Three months after implementation we observed a 3-fold increase in water taking (increase of 21.63 events per 100 students; P < .001) and a much smaller decline in milk taking (-6.73 events per 100 students; P = .012), relative to comparison schools. At 1 year, relative to baseline, there was a similar increase in water taking and no decrease in milk taking. Cafeteria workers reported that the water jets were simple to clean and operate. Conclusions. An environmental intervention in New York City public schools increased water taking and was simple to implement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume105
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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