Acculturation and Depressive Symptoms Among Dominicans in New York City

Daniel Hagen, Emily Goldmann, Nina Parikh, Melody Goodman, Bernadette Boden-Albala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Little is known about the association between acculturation and mental health among Dominican populations in the United States. Data came from a community survey of Dominican residents of New York City (n = 2744). Associations between two indicators of acculturation, proportion of life spent in the U.S. and interview language (English/Spanish), with lifetime depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥ 5) were examined using logistic regression overall and by gender. In adjusted models, respondents with English-language interview and above-median proportion of life spent in the U.S. had 77% higher odds (95% CI 1.28, 2.44) of lifetime depressive symptoms than those with Spanish-language interview and below-median proportion of life spent in the U.S. There was some evidence of elevated odds of depressive symptoms among men with English-language interview and below-median proportion of life spent in the U.S. Additional research is needed to elucidate gender-specific impacts of acculturation on mental health in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Dominicans
  • Immigrant health
  • Mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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