Acculturation and Tobacco Use among Chinese Americans

Donna Shelley, Marianne Fahs, Roberta Scheinmann, Susan Swain, Jiaojie Qu, Dee Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: We examined the relationship between acculturation and tobacco use behaviors among Chinese Americans. Methods: Using a Chinese-language instrument based on validated questions from several national surveys, we conducted in-person, household-based interviews with 712 representative adults aged 18-74 years. Results: Observed smoking prevalence was 29% for men and 4% for women. Predictors of smoking cessation included being 35 years and older and having a high level of tobacco-related knowledge. Acculturation was positively associated with a history of never smoking, as was being younger than 35 years and having a high level of tobacco-related knowledge. Conclusions: Acculturation was positively associated with never smoking among men but not with smoking cessation. However, knowledge of tobacco-related health risks was associated with both. Results indicate a need for language-specific educational interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-307
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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