Active cathepsins B, L, and S in murine and human pancreatitis

Victoria Lyo, Fiore Cattaruzza, Tyson N. Kim, Austin W. Walker, Margot Paulick, Daniel Cox, Jordan Cloyd, James Buxbaum, James Ostroff, Matthew Bogyo, Eileen F. Grady, Nigel W. Bunnett, Kimberly S. Kirkwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cathepsins regulate premature trypsinogen activation within acinar cells, a key initial step in pancreatitis. The identity, origin, and causative roles of activated cathepsins in pancreatic inflammation and pain are not defined. By using a near infrared-labeled activity-based probe (GB123) that covalently modifies active cathepsins, we localized and identified activated cathepsins in mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis and in pancreatic juice from patients with chronic pancreatitis. We used inhibitors of activated cathepsins to define their causative role in pancreatic inflammation and pain. After GB123 administration to mice with pancreatitis, reflectance and confocal imaging showed significant accumulation of the probe in inflamed pancreas compared with controls, particularly in acinar cells and macrophages, and in spinal cord microglia and neurons. Biochemical analysis of pancreatic extracts identified them as cathepsins B, L, and S (Cat-B, Cat-L, and Cat-S, respectively). These active cathepsins were also identified in pancreatic juice from patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing an endoscopic procedure for the treatment of pain, indicating cathepsin secretion. The cathepsin inhibitor K11777 suppressed cerulein-induced activation of Cat-B, Cat-L, and Cat-S in the pancreas and ameliorated pancreatic inflammation, nocifensive behavior, and activation of spinal nociceptive neurons. Thus pancreatitis is associated with an increase in the active forms of the proteases Cat-B, Cat-L, and Cat-S in pancreatic acinar cells and macrophages, and in spinal neurons and microglial cells. Inhibition of cathepsin activation ameliorated pancreatic inflammation and pain. Activity-based probes permit identification of proteases that are predictive biomarkers of disease progression and response to therapy and may be useful noninvasive tools for the detection of pancreatic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)G894-G903
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume303
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2012

Keywords

  • Activity-based probes
  • Cathepsins
  • Experimental acute pancreatitis
  • Near-infrared imaging
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

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