Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in Transitional, Low and Middle Income Countries: An International Systematic Review

Jonathan Feelemyer, Don Des Jarlais, Kamyar Arasteh, Anneli Uusküla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication is vital to reducing morbidity and mortality among HIV positive persons. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for HIV infection in transitional/low/middle income countries (TLMIC). We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting adherence to ART among persons with active injection drug use and/or histories of injection drug use in TLMIC. Meta-regression was performed to examine relationships between location, adherence measurements, and follow-up period. Fifteen studies were included from seven countries. Adherence levels ranged from 33 to 97 %; mean weighted adherence was 72 %. ART adherence was associated with different methods of measuring adherence and studies conducted in Eastern Europe and East Asia. The great heterogeneity observed precludes generalization to TLMIC as a whole. Given the critical importance of ART adherence more research is needed on ART adherence among PWID in TLMIC, including the use of standardized methods for reporting adherence to ART.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-583
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2015

Keywords

  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Developing countries
  • HIV
  • Medication adherence
  • Persons who inject drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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