Agreeing to disagree: Challenges with ambiguity in visual evidence

Camillia Matuk, Elissa Sato, Marcia Linn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Students in CSCL environments can exhibit sophisticated argumentation skills. However, the challenges of using visual evidence are rarely addressed by current technological scaffolds. In light of the issues demonstrated in a dispute between two students over the meaning of a graph, we recommend that CSCL systems not only capture the outcomes of argumentation, but also the processes, whether of agreement or dissent. These would provide valuable learning objects, as well as insights into students' learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConnecting Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning to Policy and Practice
Subtitle of host publicationCSCL 2011 Conf. Proc. - Short Papers and Posters, 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference
Pages994-995
Number of pages2
StatePublished - 2011
Event9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference: Connecting Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning to Policy and Practice, CSCL 2011 - Hong Kong, China
Duration: Jul 4 2011Jul 8 2011

Publication series

NameConnecting Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning to Policy and Practice: CSCL 2011 Conf. Proc. - Short Papers and Posters, 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conf.
Volume2

Other

Other9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference: Connecting Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning to Policy and Practice, CSCL 2011
CountryChina
CityHong Kong
Period7/4/117/8/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications

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