An experimental comparison of the effectiveness of the all-uses and all-edges adequacy criteria

Phyllis G. Frankl, Stewart N. Weiss

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    An experimental comparison of the effectiveness of the all-uses and all-edges test data adequacy criteria was performed. A large number of test sets was randomly generated for each of nine subject programs with subtle errors. For each test set, the percentages of (executable) edges and definition-use associations covered were measured and it was determined whether the test set exposed an error. Hypothesis testing was used to investigate whether all-uses adequate test sets are more likely to expose errors than are all-edges adequate test sets. All-uses was shown to be significantly more effective than all-edges for five of the subjects; moreover, for four of these, all-uses appeared to guarantee detection of the error. Further analysis showed that in four subjects, all-uses adequate test sets appeared to be more effective than all-edges adequate test sets of the same size. Logistic regression showed that in some, but not all of the subjects there was a strong positive correlation between the percentage of definition-use associations covered by a test set and its error-exposing ability.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Symposium on Testing, Analysis, and Verification, TAV 1991
    PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
    Pages154-164
    Number of pages11
    ISBN (Electronic)089791449X, 9780897914499
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Oct 1 1991
    Event4th Symposium on Testing, Analysis, and Verification, TAV 1991 - Victoria, Canada
    Duration: Oct 8 1991Oct 10 1991

    Publication series

    NameProceedings of the Symposium on Testing, Analysis, and Verification, TAV 1991

    Other

    Other4th Symposium on Testing, Analysis, and Verification, TAV 1991
    CountryCanada
    CityVictoria
    Period10/8/9110/10/91

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Software
    • Computer Networks and Communications

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