Analysis of self-efficacy for stroke recognition and action from a cluster randomised trial evaluating the effects of stroke education pamphlets versus a 12-minute culturally tailored stroke film among Black and Hispanic churchgoers in New York

Daudet Ilunga Tshiswaka, Jeanne Teresi, Joseph P. Eimicke, Jian Kong, James M. Noble, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Olajide Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Because early recognition of symptoms and timely treatment of stroke can reduce mortality and the long-term effects of such events, efforts to make many people both aware of these symptoms and knowledgeable about what to do when recognising them are critical for reducing impacts from stroke. Objectives: To assess the impact of a stroke preparedness film (intervention) and stroke preparedness pamphlets (usual care) on self-efficacy for stroke recognition and action. Design: Two-arm cluster randomised trial conducted between July 2013 and August 2018. Setting: A total of 13 church sites located in economically disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods in New York. Of the 883 churchgoers approached, 503 expressed interest, 375 completed eligibility screening and 312 were randomised. Participant inclusion criteria were Black or Hispanic churchgoers, aged 34 years or older, without stroke history, but at a high risk for stroke. The intervention consisted of two 12-minute stroke films: Gospel of Stroke, in English for Black participants, and Derrame Cerebral, in Spanish for Hispanic participants. Method: Participants were pre–post-tested (at baseline, 6-month follow-up and 12-month follow-up) for self-efficacy. Descriptive analysis, a linear mixed model and t tests were used to assess the effects of a stroke preparedness film and stroke preparedness pamphlets on self-efficacy. Results: Findings are based on intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 310 participants completed the study (99% retention rate). About half (53.8%) of participants were Black and 46.2% Hispanic in the intervention group; 48.3% were Black and 51.7% were Hispanic in the usual care group. Overall, both groups evidenced higher self-efficacy (i.e. lower predicted means) over time (p <.0001), although a significant benefit was not observed for the intervention relative to usual care. Conclusion: Both stroke preparedness films and stroke preparedness pamphlets improved self-efficacy with respect to stroke recognition and action among minority churchgoers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Education Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Linear mixed model
  • minority
  • stroke
  • stroke disparity
  • stroke self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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