Antisymmetry and Japanese

Richard S. Kayne

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    This chapter discusses antisymmetry and returns to the question of prepositions, by addressing the question of how the syntax of postpositions is to be integrated into the above-verb phrase (VP)/internal Merge approach. The proposal is that sentences with postpositions contain an extra double of P that sentences with prepositions lack; if this is correct, the difference between prepositional and postpositional sentences has something in common with cross-linguistic differences concerning clitic doubling. The emphasis is on certain aspects of the antisymmetry hypothesis of Kayne and to a certain extent on their implications for Japanese. The starting point is the hypothesis that syntactic structure is universally and without exception of the form specifier-head-complement (S-H-C): the complement of a head invariably follows that head; the associated specifier invariably precedes both head and complement. This S-H-C hypothesis is taken to hold at all stages of a derivation, both before and after movement.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationMovement and Silence
    PublisherOxford University Press
    ISBN (Electronic)9780199788330
    ISBN (Print)9780195179163
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

    Keywords

    • Antisymmetry
    • Complementizers
    • Japanese language
    • Prepositions
    • Sentences
    • Specifier-head-complement hypothesis
    • Syntax
    • Word order

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities(all)

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