Are different countries equally green with envy? A comparison of the everyday concept of envy in the United States, Spain, and Germany

Inge Schweiger Gallo, Lucia A. Görke, Miguel A. Alonso, Reyes Herrero López, Peter M. Gollwitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using a prototype approach to emotion concepts, we mapped the internal structure and content of the everyday concept of envy (as used in the United States) and its translation equivalents of envidia in Spanish and Neid in German. In Study 1 (total N = 415), the features of the concept of envy, envidia, and Neid were generated via an open-ended questionnaire. In Study 2 (total N = 404), participants rated the degree of typicality of the constitutive features on a forced-choice questionnaire. The prototype analysis of envy, supplemented with network analyses, revealed that the largest connected set of features of envy, envidia, and Neid shared a group of central features, including features related to success or to people with a better appearance. Still, envy, envidia, and Neid did differ with respect to their constituent peripheral features as well as the density of their networks, their structure, and the betweenness centrality of the nodes. These results suggest that a prototype approach combined with network analysis is a convenient approach for studying the internal structure of everyday emotion concepts and the degree of overlap with respect to the translation equivalents in different countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Envy
  • everyday emotion concept
  • internal structure
  • network analyses
  • prototype approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • General Psychology

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