Asian American-White American differences in expressions of social anxiety: A replication and extension

Sumie Okazaki, Joyce F. Liu, Sandra L. Longworth, Janice Y. Minn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined whether Asian American-White American differences on a trait measure of social anxiety extend to nonverbal behavior and to reports of anxiety-related emotions during a 3-min social performance task. Forty Asian Americans and 40 White Americans completed a trait measure of social anxiety and rated their emotions before, and immediately after, a social performance task. Their videotaped behavior was coded using microlevel behavioral codes (e.g., gaze avoidance, fidgeting). Results indicated that Asian Americans reported more anxiety than White Americans on the trait measure and on the emotion rating scales but that they did not differ substantially on microlevel behavioral indexes of social anxiety. Implications of ethnic variations in the patterns of anxious responding are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-247
Number of pages14
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • Emotion ratings
  • Observed behavior
  • Self-report
  • Social anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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