Assessment of a psychiatric intervention at community level for people who inject drugs in a low-middle income country: the DRIVE-Mind cohort study in Hai Phong, Viet Nam

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Abstract

Background: Access to psychiatric care for people who inject drugs (PWID) is limited/absent and stigmatized in most low-middle-income countries (LMICs). Innovative interventions are needed. We aimed to describe and assess the impact of a community-based psychiatric intervention among PWID in Hai Phong, Vietnam Methods: In a cohort study with one year psychiatric follow-up, PWID diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, a major depressive episode, or suicide risk, were recruited from the wider Drug-Related Infections in ViEtnam (DRIVE) project in the city of Hai Phong. The community-based psychiatric intervention included specialized follow-up (free consultations with psychiatrists, free medication, referral to mental health department for hospitalization when necessary) and support from community-based organisations (case management, harm reduction, administrative support, linkage to HIV care, methadone maintenance treatment and mental health support). The main outcome was reduction/remission of symptoms. Access to and retention in psychiatric care, quality-of-life and stigmatization were also measured pre and post-intervention. Findings: Among the 1212 participants screened from March to May 2019, 271 met the inclusion criteria, 233 (86.3%) accepted the intervention and 170 completed the follow-up (72.9%). At inclusion, 80.6% were diagnosed with current depression, 44.7% with psychotic disorder and 42.4% with suicide risk. After a one-year follow-up, these proportions dropped to 15.9%, 21.8%, and 22.9% respectively. Quality-of-life and perceived stigma related to mental health were also significantly improved, while drug use decreased only marginally. Interpretation: Community-based psychiatric interventions are both feasible and efficient in the Vietnamese context. Similar interventions should be implemented and evaluated in other, different LMICs. Funding:: This work was supported by grants from NIDA (US) (#DA041978) and ANRS (France) (#13353). The funding agencies had no role in designing the research, data analyses, or preparation of the report.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100337
JournalThe Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific
Volume18
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Internal Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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