Association between oral health and gastric precancerous lesions

Christian R. Salazar, Fritz Francois, Yihong Li, Patricia Corby, Rosemary Hays, Celine Leung, Sukhleen Bedi, Stephanie Segers, Erica Queiroz, Jinghua Sun, Beverly Wang, Hao Ho, Ronald Craig, Gustavo D. Cruz, Martin J. Blaser, Guillermo Perez-perez, Richard B. Hayes, Ananda Dasanayake, Zhiheng Pei, Yu Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although recent studies have suggested that tooth loss is positively related to the risk of gastric non-cardia cancer, the underlying oral health conditions potentially responsible for the association remain unknown. We investigated whether clinical and behavioral measures of oral health are associated with the risk of gastric precancerous lesions. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 131 patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Cases were defined as those with gastric precancerous lesions including intestinal metaplasia or chronic atrophic gastritis on the basis of standard biopsy review. A validated structured questionnaire was administered to obtain information on oral health behaviors. A comprehensive clinical oral health examination was performed on a subset of 91 patients to evaluate for periodontal disease and dental caries experience. A total of 41 (31%) cases of gastric precancerous lesions were identified. Compared with non-cases, cases were significantly more likely to not floss their teeth [odds ratio (OR) = 2.89, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-7.64], adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking status, educational attainment and Helicobacter pylori status in serum. Among participants who completed the oral examination, cases (n = 28) were more likely to have a higher percentage of sites with gingival bleeding than non-cases [OR = 2.63, 95% CI: 1.37-5.05 for a standard deviation increase in bleeding sites (equivalent to 19.7%)], independent of potential confounders. Our findings demonstrate that specific oral health conditions and behaviors such as gingival bleeding and tooth flossing are associated with gastric precancerous lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-403
Number of pages5
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Association between oral health and gastric precancerous lesions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this