Associations between bilingualism and memory generalization during infancy: Does socioeconomic status matter?

Natalie H. Brito, Ashley Greaves, Ana Leon-Santos, William P. Fifer, Kimberly G. Noble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Past studies have reported memory differences between monolingual and bilingual infants (Brito & Barr, 2012; Singh, Fu, Rahman, Hameed, Sanmugam, Agarwal, Jiang, Chong, Meaney & Rifkin-Graboi, 2015). A common critique within the bilingualism literature is the absence of socioeconomic indicators and/or a lack of socioeconomic diversity among participants. Previous research has demonstrated robust bilingual differences in memory generalization from 6- to 24-months of age. The goal of the current study was to examine if these findings would replicate in a sample of 18-month-old monolingual and bilingual infants from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds (N = 92). Results indicate no differences between language groups on working memory or cued recall, but significant differences for memory generalization, with bilingual infants outperforming monolingual infants regardless of socioeconomic status (SES). These findings replicate and extend results from past studies (Brito & Barr, 2012; Brito, Sebastián-Gallés & Barr, 2015) and suggest possible differential learning patterns dependent on linguistic experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBilingualism
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • bilingualism
  • infancy
  • memory
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Associations between bilingualism and memory generalization during infancy: Does socioeconomic status matter?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this