Associations Between COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Socio-Spatial Factors in NYC Transit Workers 50 Years and Older

Gabriella Y. Meltzer, Jordan Harris, Michelle Hefner, Paula Lanternier, Robyn R.M. Gershon, David Vlahov, Alexis A. Merdjanoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This analysis investigates how age, race/ethnicity, and geographic location contributed to vaccine hesitancy in a sample of 645 New York City (NYC) Transport Workers Union (TWU), Local 100 members surveyed in August 2020. Union members ages 50+ were 46% less likely to be vaccine hesitant than their younger counterparts (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.42, 0.97). Non-Whites (OR 3.95; 95% 2.44, 6.39) and those who did not report their race (OR 3.10; 95% CI 1.87, 5.12) were significantly more likely to be vaccine hesitant than Whites. Those who were not concerned about contracting COVID-19 in the community had 1.83 greater odds (95% CI 1.12, 2.98) of being vaccine hesitant than those who were concerned. Older respondents tended to reside in Queens while vaccine hesitant and non-White respondents were clustered in Brooklyn. General trends observed in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy persist in a population of high risk, non-healthcare essential workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Aging and Human Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • ADAR
  • COVID-19
  • essential workforce
  • older adults
  • public transit
  • vaccine hesitancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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