Associations between parent–child communication on sex health and drug use and use of drugs during sex among urban black youth

Donte T. Boyd, Ijeoma Opara, Camille R. Quinn, Bernadine Waller, S. Raquel Ramos, Dustin T. Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Black youth and their families living in urban settings may experience unique stressors that contribute to underlying issues due to the environmental context. Such factors may exacerbate and promote drug use and engagement in risky sexual behaviors, unknowingly. Little is known about how family factors, peer pressure, condom use, and other related factors are associated with substance use and engaging in sexual behaviors while on drugs among urban African American youth aged 12–22 (N = 638). We used regression models to examine associations between parental bonding, parent–adolescent sexual health communication, condom use, peer pressure on substance use, and having sex while on drugs. Multivariate results indicated that parental bonding was statistically significant and associated with drug use (OR: 1.36, 95%CI: 1.36). Our study highlights that parental bonding plays a critical role in youth using drugs while living in urban environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5170
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2021

Keywords

  • Black youth
  • Drug use
  • Parenting
  • Protective mechanisms
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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