Associations between recent gender-based violence and pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, condom use practices, and negotiation of sexual practices among HIV-positive women

Delia L. Lang, Laura F. Salazar, Gina M. Wingood, Ralph J. Diclemente, Isis Mikhail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study sought to document the prevalence of recent gender-based violence (rGBV) among seropositive women and to determine the association between rGBV and pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), condom use, and negotiation of sexual practices. METHODS: A total of 304 seropositive women recruited from HIV clinics in the southeastern United States who reported being sexually active in the previous 6 months with 1 partner were included in analyses. Gender-based violence during the previous 3 months, condom use, and negotiation of sexual practices were assessed. Biologic samples for pregnancy and STI testing were collected. RESULTS: A total of 10.2% of women reported a history of rGBV. rGBV was related to inconsistent condom use practices, pregnancy, and abuse stemming from requests for condom use. No associations were found between rGBV and negotiation of sexual practices and STIs. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of rGBV among HIV-positive women emphasizes the need for screening of abuse and highlights the need for the design and implementation of integrated intervention approaches necessary in addressing the needs of this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-221
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Keywords

  • Condom use
  • Gender-based violence
  • Pregnancy
  • Seropositive women
  • Sexually transmitted infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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