Atomic force microscopy studies of bioprocess engineering surfaces – imaging, interactions and mechanical properties mediating bacterial adhesion

Sean A. James, Nidal Hilal, Chris J. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The detrimental effect of bacterial biofilms on process engineering surfaces is well documented. Thus, interest in the early stages of bacterial biofilm formation; in particular bacterial adhesion and the production of anti-fouling coatings has grown exponentially as a field. During this time, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a critical tool for the evaluation of bacterial adhesion. Due to its versatility AFM offers not only insight into the topographical landscape and mechanical properties of the engineering surfaces, but elucidates, through direct quantification the topographical and biomechnical properties of the foulants The aim of this review is to collate the current research on bacterial adhesion, both theoretical and practical, and outline how AFM as a technique is uniquely equipped to provide further insight into the nanoscale world at the bioprocess engineering surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1600698
JournalBiotechnology Journal
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Bacteria
  • Biofouling
  • Force measurement
  • Nanoindentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Molecular Medicine

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