Attitudes and use patterns for mobile technology and upper extremity home exercises in stroke survivors in the United States

Hayejin Kim, Grace J. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The use of mobile technology (MT) in home-based occupational therapy is expected to continue growing. This study describes daily use patterns for MT and upper extremity (UE) home exercise programs (HEPs) for community-dwelling stroke survivors in the United States. Method: Cross-sectional survey. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate comparisons. Results: N = 61 (30 stroke and 31 controls). Individuals with stroke had similar levels of knowledge, skill, and use of MT compared with non-disabled age-matched adults. Stroke participants used MT more frequently for information searching, social media, and reminders compared to control participants. Stroke participants were motivated to improve UE function (93.3%) and reported a need for additional HEP training (56.7%). Perceived facilitators to improve UE use included talking to peers (73.3%), getting more information (73.3%), and talking to a therapist (63.3%). Conclusions: MT may have multiple potential benefits when integrated into occupational therapy practice including supporting instrumental ADLs, facilitating social connection, and increasing adherence to UE HEPs. Future work should focus on maximizing adherence and providing performance feedback through the use of social media to promote peer support and consistent remote communication using text messaging, phone calls, or video calls to deliver information and reminders on exercises.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • health behavior
  • home exercise
  • mHealth
  • mobile technology
  • rehabilitation
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Occupational Therapy

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