Attitudes Toward Male Oral Contraceptives: Implications for Models of the Relationship Between Beliefs and Attitudes

James Jaccard, Daniel Hand, Lucille Ku, Kathleen Richardson, Rudolfo Abella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Four factors (effectiveness, health risks, cost, and convenience) were orthogonally manipulated in a 3 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design to determine their relative importance in influencing attitudes toward and intentions to use male oral contraceptives. The experimental design also permitted a test of the assumption of additivity underlying expectancy‐value models of attitude and the assumption of absence of context effects. Results were consistent with expectancy‐value models of the relationship between beliefs and attitudes. In addition, it was found that health risks and effedtiveness, in that order, were the most important factors influencing receptivity to male oral contraceptives, with the effects of cost and convenience being mediated by these two factors. Sex differences in attitudes toward male oral contraceptives were also observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-191
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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