Avoiding health insurance crowd-out: Evidence from the medicare as secondary payer legislation

Sherry Glied, Mark Stabile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The cost of expanding health insurance coverage increases when people who would otherwise purchase insurance obtain public coverage. This paper investigates the effects of one of the first efforts to target insurance benefits to the most needy, the 1982 medicare as secondary payer (MSP) provisions.We find strong evidence of low compliance with the MSP both in terms of medical bill payments (payment compliance) and employer-sponsored insurance coverage (coverage compliance). We estimate payer compliance at approximately 33%. Coverage compliance is lower, at under 25%. We find weak evidence that the MSP caused older workers to shift toward MSP-exempt jobs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-260
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Coverage compliance
  • Crowd-out
  • Payer compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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