Avoiding theoretical optimality to efficiently and privately retrieve security updates

Justin Cappos

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of building a PIR system with performance similar to non-PIR systems in real situations. Prior Chor PIR systems have chosen block sizes that are theoretically optimized to minimize communication. This (ironically) reduces the throughput of the resulting system by roughly 50x. We constructed a Chor PIR system called upPIR that is efficient by choosing block sizes that are theoretically suboptimal (from a communications standpoint), but fast and efficient in practice. For example, an upPIR mirror running on a threeyear- old desktop provides security updates from Ubuntu 10.04 (1.4 GB of data) fast enough to saturate a T3 link. Measurements run using mirrors distributed around the Internet demonstrate that a client can download software updates with upPIR about as quickly as with FTP.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationFinancial Cryptography and Data Security - 17th International Conference, FC 2013, Revised Selected Papers
    Pages386-394
    Number of pages9
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2013
    Event17th International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, FC 2013 - Okinawa, Japan
    Duration: Apr 1 2013Apr 5 2013

    Publication series

    NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
    Volume7859 LNCS
    ISSN (Print)0302-9743
    ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

    Other

    Other17th International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, FC 2013
    CountryJapan
    CityOkinawa
    Period4/1/134/5/13

    Keywords

    • Performance
    • Practical Security
    • Private Information Retrieval

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Theoretical Computer Science
    • Computer Science(all)

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