Behavioral risk reduction in a declining HIV epidemic: Injection drug users in New York City, 1990-1997

Don C.D. Des Jarlais, Theresa Perlis, Samuel R. Friedman, Timothy Chapman, John Kwok, Russell Rockwell, Denise Paone, Judith Milliken, Edgar Monterroso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. This study assessed trends in HIV risk behaviors among injection drug users in New York City from 1990 to 1997. Methods. Injection drug users were recruited continuously from a large drug detoxification treatment program (N = 2588) and a research storefront located in a high- drug-use area (N = 2701). Informed consent was obtained, and a trained interviewer administered a structured interview covering sociodemographics, drug use history, HIV risk behavior, and participation in syringe exchange. Results. Trends were assessed for 5 risk behaviors in the 6-month period before the interview. The 3 injection risk behaviors declined significantly over time at each site (all P<.01). When data were pooled across sites, all 5 risk behaviors declined significantly over time (all P<.01). Participation in syringe exchange programs and in HIV counseling and testing increased greatly from 1990 to 1997. Conclusions. The continuing risk reduction among injection drug users indicates a 'declining phase' in the large HIV epidemic in New York City. HIV prevention programs appear to be making an important contribution to the declining phase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1112-1116
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume90
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Behavioral risk reduction in a declining HIV epidemic: Injection drug users in New York City, 1990-1997'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this