Belief in AIDS origin conspiracy theory and willingness to participate in biomedical research studies: Findings in whites, blacks, and hispanics in seven cities across two surveys

Stefanie Russell, Ralph Katz, Min Wang, Ryan Lee, B. Green, Nancy Kressin, Cristina Claudio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a belief in the AIDS origin conspiracy theory is related to likelihood or fear of participation in research studies. Methods: The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered via random-digit-dialed telephone interview to black, white, and Hispanic participants in 4 cities in 1999 and 2000 (n = 1,133) and in 3 cities in 2003 (n = 1,162). Results: In 1999, 27.8% of blacks, 23.6% of Hispanics, and 8% of whites (P ≠.001) reported that it was "very or somewhat likely" that AIDS is "the result of a government plan to intentionally kill a certain group of people by genocide." In 2003, 34.1% of blacks, 21.9% of Hispanics, and 8.4% of whites (P â‰.001) reported the same. Conclusions: Whereas blacks and Hispanics were more than 3 times more likely than whites to believe in this AIDS origin conspiracy theory, holding this belief was not associated with a decreased likelihood of participation in, or increased fear of participation in, biomedical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-47
Number of pages11
JournalHIV Clinical Trials
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • HIV
  • biomedical research
  • conspiracy theory
  • health disparities
  • research participation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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