Beliefs and perceptions of mentorship among nursing faculty and traditional and accelerated undergraduate nursing students

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background In order to meet the demands of a dynamic and complex health care landscape, nursing education must develop and implement programming to produce a highly educated nursing workforce. Interprofessional honors education in nursing with targeted mentorship is one such model. Purpose To describe undergraduate nursing student and faculty perceptions and beliefs of mentorship in the context of interprofessional honors education, and compare and contrast the perceptions and beliefs about mentorship in interprofessional honors education between undergraduate nursing students and faculty. Methods The study used a cross-sectional, descriptive design. Data were collected at an urban university in the northeast US, using a researcher-developed electronic survey. The sample included 24 full-time nursing faculty, and 142 undergraduate nursing students. Results Perceptions and beliefs regarding mentorship in the context of interprofessional honors education were similar for faculty and students, with both ranking mentorship among the most important components of a successful honors program. Conclusions Honors education with a dedicated mentorship component may be implemented to improve the undergraduate education experience, facilitate advanced degree attainment, and develop future nursing leaders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-24
Number of pages5
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Baccalaureate
  • Education
  • Nursing
  • Surveys and questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

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