Bidirectional relations between executive function and expressive vocabulary in kindergarten and first grade / Relaciones bidireccionales entre la función ejecutiva y el vocabulario expresivo en jardín de infantes y primer grado

M. Paula Daneri, Clancy Blair

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

: Research suggests that language predicts executive function (EF) in the preschool period; however, the relation between language and EF in the transition to formal schooling has not been previously examined. Given that language and EF are both important for school readiness, it is valuable to examine the ways in which they may be interrelated during the start of formal schooling. Research and theory suggest that expressive language in particular may be bidirectionally related to EF. To test this hypothesis, we analysed data from five- and six-year-old children (N = 347) who completed measures of expressive vocabulary and EF in the fall and spring of kindergarten and the fall of first grade. Path analysis revealed significant cross-lagged paths between EF and expressive vocabulary in kindergarten and from kindergarten into first grade, above and beyond stability in these constructs. The findings are discussed in relation to the current understanding of the relation between language and EF and the best ways in which to support and promote school readiness and early school achievement.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1-27
Number of pages27
JournalEstudios de Psicologia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 28 2017

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Vocabulary
Executive Function
Language
Research

Keywords

  • achievement
  • executive function
  • language development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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title = "Bidirectional relations between executive function and expressive vocabulary in kindergarten and first grade / Relaciones bidireccionales entre la función ejecutiva y el vocabulario expresivo en jardín de infantes y primer grado",
abstract = ": Research suggests that language predicts executive function (EF) in the preschool period; however, the relation between language and EF in the transition to formal schooling has not been previously examined. Given that language and EF are both important for school readiness, it is valuable to examine the ways in which they may be interrelated during the start of formal schooling. Research and theory suggest that expressive language in particular may be bidirectionally related to EF. To test this hypothesis, we analysed data from five- and six-year-old children (N = 347) who completed measures of expressive vocabulary and EF in the fall and spring of kindergarten and the fall of first grade. Path analysis revealed significant cross-lagged paths between EF and expressive vocabulary in kindergarten and from kindergarten into first grade, above and beyond stability in these constructs. The findings are discussed in relation to the current understanding of the relation between language and EF and the best ways in which to support and promote school readiness and early school achievement.",
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