Breaking the millisecond barrier: Robots and self-driving cars will need completely reengineered networks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

FOR COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS, bandwidth has long been king. With every generation of fiber optic, cellular, or Wi-Fi technology has come a jump in throughput that has enriched our online lives. Twenty years ago we were merely exchanging texts on our phones, but we now think nothing of streaming videos from YouTube and Netflix. No wonder, then, that video now consumes up to 60 percent of Internet bandwidth. If this trend continues, we might yet see full-motion holography delivered to our mobiles - a techie dream since Princess Leia's plea for help in Star Wars. • Recently, though, high bandwidth has begun to share the spotlight with a different metric of merit: low latency. The amount of latency varies drastically depending on how far in a network a signal travels, how many routers it passes through, whether it uses a wired or wireless connection, and so on. The typical latency in a 4G network, for example, is 50 milliseconds. Reducing latency to 10 milliseconds, as 5G and Wi-Fi are currently doing, opens the door to a whole slew of applications that high bandwidth alone cannot. With virtual-reality headsets, for example, a delay of more than about 10 milliseconds in rendering and displaying images in response to head movement is very perceptible, and it leads to a disorienting experience that is for some akin to seasickness. • Multiplayer games, autonomous vehicles, and factory robots also need extremely low latencies. Even as 5G and Wi-Fi make 10 milliseconds the new standard for latency, researchers, like my group at New York University's NYU Wireless research center, are already working hard on another order-of-magnitude reduction, to about 1 millisecond or less. • Pushing latencies down to 1 millisecond will require reengineering every step of the communications process. In the past, engineers have ignored sources of minuscule delay because they were inconsequential to the overall latency. Now, researchers will have to develop new methods for encoding, transmitting, and routing data to shave off even the smallest sources of delay. And immutable laws of physics - specifically the speed of light - will dictate firm restrictions on what networks with 1-millisecond latencies will look like. There's no one-size-fits-all technique that will enable these extremely low-latency networks. Only by combining solutions to all these sources of latency will it be possible to build networks where time is never wasted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9262144
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalIEEE Spectrum
Volume57
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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