Bridging the gap: Using microsociological theory to understand how expressed emotion predicts clinical outcomes

Victoria Stanhope, Phyllis Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research has shown that expressed emotion (EE) among families is a strong predictor of relapse for people with severe mental illness. Recent studies have also found the presence of EE in consumer-provider relationships. Despite high consistency in the findings related to EE and relapse, the concept has weak validity as little is known about how exactly it triggers relapse. Microsociological theory provides a framework with which to analyze social interaction and, more specifically, understand how interactions relate to the emotions of pride and shame. By identifying the components of interaction rituals, the theory provides insight into the key processes underlying EE and demonstrates how methodologies based on direct observation have the potential to measure EE with greater validity. This article describes how microsociological theory can be applied to the concept of EE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-128
Number of pages12
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • Expressed emotion
  • Methods
  • Severe mental illness
  • Sociology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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