Building community one relationship at a time: Consequences for the seeking and acceptance of help

Angelina Davis-Lipman, Tom R. Tyler, Susan M. Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Three studies test the hypothesis that a perceived relationship is relevant to seeking and accepting help. The results first indicate a direct effect for a perceived relationship on the extent to which people are willing to seek and accept help. The findings further indicate that perceiving a relationship increases the importance of procedural justice judgments in shaping the decision to seek and accept help. This was true both in vertical relations (e.g., student-professor, resident-police officer) and in horizontal ones (e.g., student-student). The research extends prior findings showing that common group membership increases the influence of procedural justice judgments on whether people cooperate with fellow group members. The results show a parallel with the effects of a perceived relationship, suggesting a comparability between "relational" and "collective" levels of identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-206
Number of pages26
JournalSocial Justice Research
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • Group value model
  • Help acceptance
  • Help seeking
  • Perceived relationships
  • Procedural justice
  • Relational self

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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