Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Education Using a Virtual Environment in Sexual-Minority Men of Color With HIV: Protocol for a Sequential, Mixed Method, Waitlist Randomized Controlled Trial

S. Raquel Ramos, Constance Johnson, Gail Melkus, Trace Kershaw, Marya Gwadz, Harmony Reynolds, Allison Vorderstrasse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: It is estimated that 70% of all deaths each year in the United States are due to chronic conditions. Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a chronic condition, is the leading cause of death in ethnic and racial minority males. It has been identified as the second most common cause of death in persons with HIV. By the year 2030, it is estimated that 78% of persons with HIV will be diagnosed with CVD. Objective: We propose the first technology-based virtual environment intervention to address behavioral, modifiable risk factors associated with cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities in sexual-minority men of color with HIV. Methods: This study will be guided using social cognitive theory and the Technology Acceptance Model. A sequential, mixed method, waitlist controlled randomized control feasibility trial will be conducted. Aim 1 is to qualitatively explore perceptions of cardiovascular risk in 15 participants. Aim 2 is to conduct a waitlist controlled comparison to test if a virtual environment is feasible and acceptable for CVD prevention, based on web-based, self-assessed, behavioral, and psychosocial outcomes in 80 sexual-minority men of color with HIV. Results: The study was approved by the New York University Institutional Review Board in 2019, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston in 2020, and by the Yale University Institutional Review Board in February 2022. As of April 2022, aim 1 data collection is 87% completed. We expect to complete data collection for aim 1 by April 30, 2022. Recruitment for aim 2 will begin mid-May 2022. Conclusions: This study will be the first online virtual environment intervention for CVD prevention in sexual-minority men of color with HIV. We anticipate that the intervention will be beneficial for CVD prevention education and building peer social supports, resulting in change or modification over time in risk behaviors for CVD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere38348
JournalJMIR Research Protocols
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2022

Keywords

  • behavioral intervention
  • cardiovascular disease
  • consumer health informatics
  • gamification
  • health communication
  • HIV
  • prevention education
  • sexual minority men
  • virtual environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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