Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Partnerships with External Behavioral and Social Scientists. Roles, Extramural Funding, and Employment

Deborah L. Rugg, Richard Levinson, Ralph DiClemente, Martin Fishbein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) must have strong external partnerships with behavioral and social scientists to refine and carry out its research and programmatic mission. This article examines funding, employment, and other mechanisms used to develop and foster such partnerships. The authors describe in detail funding mechanisms (especially the often-used cooperative agreement and contracting mechanisms) and identify specific sources of information about funding opportunities. Furthermore, they describe several different long- and short-term employment mechanisms that can be used to link CDC staff and external behavioral scientists. Finally, external behavioral and social scientists can serve in important roles as members of CDC advisory committees, peer reviewers of funding applications, and consultants; examples of these opportunities are also provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-153
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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