Changes in HIV seroprevalence and related behaviors among male injection drug users who do and do not have sex with men: New York City, 1990-1999

Carey B. Maslow, Samuel R. Friedman, Theresa E. Perlis, Russell Rockwell, Don C. Des Jarlais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined HIV prevalence and risk behaviors among male injection drug users (IDUs) who have sex with men and among other male IDUs. Methods. Male IDUs were interviewed and tested for HIV at a detoxification clinic during 1990 to 1994 and 1995 to 1999. Analyses compared male IDUs who do and do not have sex with men within and between periods. Results. Initially, HIV seroprevalence and risk behaviors were higher among IDUs who have sex with men. Seroprevalence (initially 60.5% vs 48.3%) declined approximately 15% in both groups, remaining higher among those who have sex with men. Generally, injection prevalence, but not sexual risk behaviors, declined. Conclusions. Male IDUs who have sex with men are more likely to engage in higher-risk behaviors and to be HIV infected. Improved intervention approaches for male IDUs who have sex with men are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-384
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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