Children's liking of landscape paintings as a function of their perceptions of prospect, refuge, and hazard

Mary Ann Fischer, Patrick E. Shrout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prospect-refuge theorywas used to study children's aesthetic responses to landscape paintings. Sixty-seven children between the ages of 8 and 15 years reported their liking for 28 landscape paintings and their perceptions of the degree of prospect, refuge, and hazard in those paintings. Consistent with expectations, children were able to express systematic preferences and judgments of degrees of prospect, refuge, and hazard. Liking was significantly related to perceptions of prospect, to interactions between prospect and refuge, and to interactions between prospect and hazard. Contrary to expectations, age did not moderate the effects of prospect, refuge, and hazard perceptions on liking and boys, but not girls, actually preferred pictures that they perceived to be more hazardous than other pictures. Results are discussed in terms of consistency with previous results and with Darwinian explanations for aesthetic feelings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-393
Number of pages21
JournalEnvironment and Behavior
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

Keywords

  • Children
  • Landscape paintings
  • Prospect-refuge theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Children's liking of landscape paintings as a function of their perceptions of prospect, refuge, and hazard'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this