Claiming a moral minority, saccades help create a biased majority: Tracking eye movements to base rates in social predictions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

How do people hold erroneous views about their own moral behavior? This study investigated the use of distributional information in self and social predictions by measuring eye movements to base rates. Across 15 scenarios, participants claimed moral superiority over a comparison peer by predicting that base rates would be less predictive of one's own behaviors than a comparison peer's. In support of the differential use of distributional information hypothesis, participants looked less often to base rate information when making self rather than social predictions. Eye movements mediated the relationship between target of the prediction and the strength of the relationship between base rates and behavioral likelihood estimates. Implications for self-deception in self and social judgment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)970-973
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Keywords

  • Above average effect
  • Base rates
  • Social judgement
  • Vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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