Classroom-based interventions and teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence: Evidence from a randomized trial in Head Start settings

Fuhua Zhai, C. Cybele Raver, Christine Li-Grining

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job demands, and confidence in behavior management. Using a clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, the CSRP provided multifaceted services to the treatment group, including teacher training and mental health consultation, which were accompanied by stress-reduction services and workshops. Overall, 90 teachers in 35 classrooms at 18 Head Start sites participated in the study. After adjusting for teacher and classroom factors and site fixed effects, we found that the CSRP had significant effects on the improvement of teachers' perceived job control and work-related resources. We also found that the CSRP decreased teachers' confidence in behavior management and had no statistically significant effects on job demands. Overall, we did not find significant moderation effects of teacher race/ethnicity, education, teaching experience, or teacher type. The implications for research and policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-452
Number of pages11
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Classroom-based intervention
  • Confidence
  • Head Start
  • Perceived job stressors
  • Randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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