Client Cooperative Interview Behavior and Outcome in Paradoxical and Behavioral Brief Treatment Approaches

Michael A. Westerman, A. Steven Frankel, J. S. Tanaka, Jana Kahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the differential implications of client cooperation for improvement in behavioral versus paradoxical brief treatment approaches. The subjects included 16 clients who completed a brief course of counseling, 9 in a paradoxical condition and 7 in a behavioral condition. Client cooperation versus resistance was assessed on the basis of behavior during intake interviews in terms of the coordinating style construct (Westerman, Tanaka, Frankel, & Kahn, 1986), which assesses how well the client coordinates contributions to the interaction with the interviewer's contributions and the client's own contributions at other points in time. As hypothesized, there was a stronger negative relation between noncoordinating style and improvement in the behavioral condition as compared with the paradoxical condition. The findings provide preliminary empirical support for the widely held position that a paradoxical approach is especially well suited for resistant clients, whereas behavioral approaches are appropriate for cooperative clients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-102
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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