Clinical evaluation of an all-in-one adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions with different degrees of dentin sclerosis

André V. Ritter, Harald O. Heymann, Edward J. Swift, John R. Sturdevant, Aldridge D. Wilder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This randomized clinical trial compared the performance of an all-in-one adhesive (iBond) applied in sclerotic and non-sclerotic non-carious cervical lesions with that of a three-step etchprime-bond adhesive (Gluma Solid Bond, SB). One-hundred and five lesions were randomly assigned to four groups according to adhesive, sclerosis scale and technique: 1) SB applied to lesions with sclerosis scale 1 and 2 (n=26); 2) iBond applied to lesions with sclerosis scale 1 and 2 (n=28); 3) iBond applied to lesions with sclerosis scale 3 and 4 (n=25) and 4) iBond applied with prior acid-etching to lesions with sclerosis scale 3 and 4 (n=26). A microfilled composite (Durafill VS) was used as the restorative material. The restorations were evaluated for retention, color match, marginal adaptation, anatomic form, cavosurface margin discoloration, secondary caries, pre- and post-operative sensitivity, surface texture and fracture at insertion (baseline), 6, 18 months and at 3 years using modified USPHS evaluation criteria (Alfa=excellent; Bravo=clinically acceptable; Charlie=clinically unacceptable). There was a high percentage of Bravo scores for marginal adaptation (4%-32%) and marginal discoloration (18%-60%) in Groups 2, 3 and 4, but all groups had <5% Charlie scores at 6 months and <10% Charlie scores at 18 months for retention and marginal discoloration, respectively. However, it should be noted that 13% of the restorations in Group 4 were not retained at three years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-378
Number of pages9
JournalOperative dentistry
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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