Cognitive dissonance and the perception of natural environments

Emily Balcetis, David Dunning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two studies demonstrated that the motivation to resolve cognitive dissonance affects the visual perception of physical environments. In Study 1, subjects crossed a campus quadrangle wearing a costume reminiscent of Carmen Miranda. In Study 2, subjects pushed themselves up a hill while kneeling on a skateboard. Subjects performed either task under a high-choice, low-choice, or control condition. Subjects in the high-choice conditions, presumably to resolve dissonance, perceived the environment to be less aversive than did subjects in the low-choice and control conditions, seeing a shorter distance to travel (Study 1) and a shallower slope to climb (Study 2). These studies suggest that the impact of motivational states extends from social judgment down into perceptual processes. ©

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages917-921
Number of pages5
JournalPsychological Science
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Fingerprint

Cognitive Dissonance
Skating
Visual Perception
Motivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Cognitive dissonance and the perception of natural environments. / Balcetis, Emily; Dunning, David.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 18, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 917-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3f09432df4fe45b9ba6f05db490ef16b,
title = "Cognitive dissonance and the perception of natural environments",
abstract = "Two studies demonstrated that the motivation to resolve cognitive dissonance affects the visual perception of physical environments. In Study 1, subjects crossed a campus quadrangle wearing a costume reminiscent of Carmen Miranda. In Study 2, subjects pushed themselves up a hill while kneeling on a skateboard. Subjects performed either task under a high-choice, low-choice, or control condition. Subjects in the high-choice conditions, presumably to resolve dissonance, perceived the environment to be less aversive than did subjects in the low-choice and control conditions, seeing a shorter distance to travel (Study 1) and a shallower slope to climb (Study 2). These studies suggest that the impact of motivational states extends from social judgment down into perceptual processes. {\circledC}",
author = "Emily Balcetis and David Dunning",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.02000.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "917--921",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive dissonance and the perception of natural environments

AU - Balcetis, Emily

AU - Dunning, David

PY - 2007/10

Y1 - 2007/10

N2 - Two studies demonstrated that the motivation to resolve cognitive dissonance affects the visual perception of physical environments. In Study 1, subjects crossed a campus quadrangle wearing a costume reminiscent of Carmen Miranda. In Study 2, subjects pushed themselves up a hill while kneeling on a skateboard. Subjects performed either task under a high-choice, low-choice, or control condition. Subjects in the high-choice conditions, presumably to resolve dissonance, perceived the environment to be less aversive than did subjects in the low-choice and control conditions, seeing a shorter distance to travel (Study 1) and a shallower slope to climb (Study 2). These studies suggest that the impact of motivational states extends from social judgment down into perceptual processes. ©

AB - Two studies demonstrated that the motivation to resolve cognitive dissonance affects the visual perception of physical environments. In Study 1, subjects crossed a campus quadrangle wearing a costume reminiscent of Carmen Miranda. In Study 2, subjects pushed themselves up a hill while kneeling on a skateboard. Subjects performed either task under a high-choice, low-choice, or control condition. Subjects in the high-choice conditions, presumably to resolve dissonance, perceived the environment to be less aversive than did subjects in the low-choice and control conditions, seeing a shorter distance to travel (Study 1) and a shallower slope to climb (Study 2). These studies suggest that the impact of motivational states extends from social judgment down into perceptual processes. ©

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34748838994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34748838994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.02000.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.02000.x

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 917

EP - 921

JO - Psychological Science

T2 - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 10

ER -