Comparative in vitro sensitivities of human immune cell lines, vaginal and cervical epithelial cell lines, and primary cells to candidate microbicides nonoxynol 9, C31G, and sodium dodecyl sulfate

Fred C. Krebs, Shendra R. Miller, Bradley J. Catalone, Raina Fichorova, Deborah Anderson, Daniel Malamud, Mary K. Howett, Brian Wigdahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In experiments to assess the in vitro impact of the candidate microbicides nonoxynol 9 (N-9), C31G, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on human immune and epithelial cell viability, cell lines and primary cell populations of lymphocytic and monocytic origin were generally shown to be equally sensitive to exposures ranging from 10 min to 48 h. However, U-937 cells were more sensitive to N-9 and C31G after 48 h than were primary monocyte-derived macrophages. Cytokine activation of monocytes and lymphocytes had no effect on cell viability following exposure to these microbicidal compounds. Primary and passaged vaginal epithelial cultures and cell lines differed in sensitivity to N-9 and C31G but not SDS. These studies provide a foundation for in vitro experiments in which cell lines of human immune and epithelial origin can be used as suitable surrogates for primary cells to further investigate the effects of microbicides on cell metabolism, membrane composition, and integrity and the effects of cell type, proliferation, and differentiation on microbicide sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2292-2298
Number of pages7
JournalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Volume46
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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