Comparing two whole task patient simulations for two different dental education topics

Elizabeth McAlpin, Marci Levine, Jan L. Plass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated the effect of two types of whole task patient simulations, role-play and web-based, on learning outcomes for two topics, local anesthesia and non-surgical extractions, in a foundational oral maxillofacial surgery course for second year pre-clinical dental students. Using a 2x2 factorial design, we asked which simulation model allows for deeper cognitive engagement that fosters higher learning outcomes for novices practicing complex skills as a professional, a collaborative role-play simulation (Role-Play Sim), or an individually-paced web-based simulation (Web Sim)? In two studies covering two different topics, we compared the effect of these simulations on 50-item multiple-choice knowledge tests. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups: No Sim, Web Sim, Role-Play Sim, or Both Sims. For study 1 covering local anesthesia, there was a statistically significant main effect for the Role-Play Sim, F (1, 105) = 103.804, p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.497, but not for the Web Sim, F (1, 105) = 1.655, p = 0.201. Similarly, for study 2 covering extractions, there was a statistically significant main effect for the Role-Play Sim, F (1, 108) = 162.362, p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.601, but not for the Web Sim, F (1, 108) = 0.072, p = 0.798. The interaction term was not statistically significant in either study. Results suggest that role-play simulations achieved a higher level of learning outcomes than the web-based patient simulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101690
JournalLearning and Instruction
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Extractions
  • Local anesthesia
  • Patient simulation
  • Role-play
  • Simulation
  • Web based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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