Comparison of Dietary Patterns, Perceptions of Health, and Perceived Barriers to a Heart Healthy Diet Before and After Coronary Artery Angiography

Calvin Ngai, Lisa Ganguzza, Laura Flink, Kathleen Woolf, Yu Guo, Victor Acosta, Eugenia Gianos, James Slater, Joseph Burdowski, Binita Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Poor dietary patterns are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to determine whether reported dietary patterns change after undergoing invasive coronary angiography. Participants without a history of coronary revascularization were prospectively enrolled before undergoing coronary angiography at a tertiary center between February 2015 and February 2017. Enrolled participants completed the Rate Your Plate (RYP) survey at baseline (before angiography), 1-month, and 6-month follow-ups. RYP scores range from 24 to 72 (higher scores indicate healthier dietary patterns) are presented as median (interquartile range), and are compared from baseline to follow-up using a nonparametric related-sample test. No dietary guidance was given outside of usual care. Of the 400 participants, 326 (82%) completed at least 1 follow-up survey with no differences in baseline characteristics of participants who had at least 1 versus no follow-up survey. The median RYP score significantly improved from baseline (53 [47 to 57]) to 1-month (58 [52 to 62]) and 6-month (59 [54 to 63]) follow-ups (p <0.001). Angiography demonstrated severe CAD in 125 (38%) and normal or nonobstructive CAD in 201 (62%) participants. RYP scores significantly improved over time in both groups (p <0.001), but the percent change in RYP score over time was greater in participants with versus without severe CAD (13.9% [5.8 to 22.5] vs 9.6% [4.8 to 19.1], p = 0.03). In conclusion, self-reported dietary patterns improved after invasive coronary angiography, particularly in the subset with CAD. Future studies to determine how best to utilize the periprocedural period to further improve dietary patterns in this population are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)865-873
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of Dietary Patterns, Perceptions of Health, and Perceived Barriers to a Heart Healthy Diet Before and After Coronary Artery Angiography'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this