Comparison of social cognition using an adapted Chinese version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test in drug-naive and regularly medicated individuals with chronic schizophrenia and healthy controls in rural China

Fei Deng, Michael R. Phillips, Bing Cai, Gary Yu, Min Qian, Margaux M.R. Grivel, Hanhui Chen, Xinyi Ouyang, Fang Xue, Mingru Zhao, Lawrence S. Kegeles, Ezra S. Susser, Matcheri S. Keshavan, William S. Stone, Lawrence H. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Social cognition has not previously been assessed in treatment-naive patients with chronic schizophrenia, in patients over 60 years of age, or in patients with less than 5 years of schooling. Methods We revised a commonly used measure of social cognition, the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET), by expanding the instructions, using both self-completion and interviewer-completion versions (for illiterate respondents), and classifying each test administration as 'successfully completed' or 'incomplete'. The revised instrument (RMET-CV-R) was administered to 233 treatment-naive patients with chronic schizophrenia (UT), 154 treated controls with chronic schizophrenia (TC), and 259 healthy controls (HC) from rural communities in China. Results In bivariate and multivariate analyses, successful completion rates and RMET-CV-R scores (percent correct judgments about emotion exhibited in 70 presented slides) were highest in HC, intermediate in TC, and lowest in UT (adjusted completion rates, 97.0, 72.4, and 49.9%, respectively; adjusted RMET-CV-R scores, 45.4, 38.5, and 34.6%, respectively; all p < 0.02). Stratified analyses by the method of administration (self-completed v. interviewer-completed) and by education and age ('educated-younger' v. 'undereducated-older') show the same relationship between groups (i.e. NC>TC>UT), though not all differences remain statistically significant. Conclusions We find poorer social cognition in treatment-naive than in treated patients with chronic schizophrenia. The discriminant validity of RMET-CV-R in undereducated, older patients demonstrates the feasibility of administering revised versions of RMET to patients who may otherwise be considered ineligible due to education or age by changing the method of test administration and carefully assessing respondents' ability to complete the task successfully.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • China
  • Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET)
  • low-and middle-income countries (LMIC)
  • schizophrenia
  • social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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