Concordance and Discordance in the Geographic Distribution of Childhood Obesity and Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes in New York City

Marcela Osorio, Christian A. Koziatek, Mary Pat Gallagher, Jessie Recaii, Meryle Weinstein, Lorna E. Thorpe, Brian Elbel, David C. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: As rates of childhood obesity and pediatric type 2 diabetes (T2D) increase, a better understanding is needed of how these 2 conditions relate and which subgroups of children are more likely to develop diabetes with and without obesity. Methods: To compare hotspots of childhood obesity and pediatric T2D in New York City, we performed geospatial clustering analyses on obesity estimates obtained from surveys of school-aged children and diabetes estimates obtained from health care claims data, from 2009 to 2013. Analyses were performed at the Census tract level. We then used multivariable regression analysis to identify sociodemographic and environmental factors associated with these hotspots. Results: We identified obesity hotspots in Census tracts with a higher proportion of Black or Hispanic residents, with low median household income, or located in a food swamp. Total 51.1% of pediatric T2D hotspots overlapped with obesity hotspots. For pediatric T2D, hotspots were identified in Census tracts with a higher proportion of Black residents and a lower proportion of Hispanic residents. Conclusions: Non-Hispanic Black neighborhoods had a higher probability of being hotspots of both childhood obesity and pediatric T2D. However, we identified a discordance between hotspots of childhood obesity and pediatric diabetes in Hispanic neighborhoods, suggesting either under-detection or under-diagnosis of diabetes, or that obesity may influence diabetes risk differently in these 2 populations. These findings warrant further investigation of the relationship between childhood obesity and pediatric diabetes among different racial and ethnic groups, and may help guide pediatric public health interventions to specific neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)809-815
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • childhood obesity
  • geographic analysis
  • hotspots
  • pediatric diabetes
  • sociodemographic factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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