Concurrent partnerships and HIV prevalence disparities by race: Linking science and public health practice

Martina Morris, Ann E. Kurth, Deven T. Hamilton, James Moody, Steve Wakefield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Concurrent sexual partnerships may help to explain the disproportionately high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among African Americans. The persistence of such disparities would also require strong assortative mixing by race. We examined descriptive evidence from 4 nationally representative US surveys and found consistent support for both elements of this hypothesis. Using a data-driven network simulation model, we found that the levels of concurrency and assortative mixing observed produced a 2.6-fold racial disparity in the epidemic potential among young African American adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1023-1031
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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